I am pretty sure that the word ‘scale’ is a trigger word for many people, but don’t worry! Today we are talking about a different kind of ‘scale’… it is Principle #4 in our 6 part series on Great Event Floral Design.

 

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When chatting with our talented florist, Joseph, he explained that scale in floral design is pretty much what you would expect it to be.

“Scale is a comparison of the size of a design, to the size of the area it is placed. It is also the¬†proportion as it applies to the space, area, or venue that surrounds the design.”

Basically, big room = big flowers.

Of course, there’s a lot more to it than that, one must take into account the size of the display surface, height of the ceilings, number (and location) of tables.

 

Proportion vs. Scale

“Proportion and scale are very closely related in floral design” Joseph goes on to explain. “In fact, size, proportion and scale are almost interchangeable terms in event design overall”.

“Proportion refers to the size relationship between elements such as flowers, foliage, containers and accessories in a design. Scale is very important when considering the relation of the vessel or vase to the flowers used with the design.”

Joseph then gave me an example that really all made it come together: “I like to use large blooms such as hydrangea and fully open roses in large scale pieces; while these flowers would likely overpower a small compote container. “

 

The Cotton Room, in Durham is a spacious venue with high ceilings. Joseph designed the arrangement as seen below in this gorgeous picture taken by 6ft Photography.

 

I like to use large blooms such as hydrangea and fully open roses in large scale pieces; while these flowers would likely overpower a small compote container.

 

See those big blooms? Perfection.

 

Advice to Design By

I loved this little reminder that Joseph provided as well. Of course this is a general idea but it’s still a great thing to keep in mind when you’re designing that dream event!

“With a 60″ round seating table you’ll have around 15″ to 20″ of centerpiece space in the middle of the table to work with. For a long banquet style table (8’x30″) you will only have about 7″ to 10″ of centerpiece space down the length of the table”.

 

 

There you have it folks! Principle #4 complete. Tune in next week for some more fun on our Petal & Oak Blog!

 

 

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